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2011/08/29

超人のジャーナリスト・アイ 146 Tropical Storm Irene ニュージャージー州に再上陸

ハリケーン「アイリーン」は熱帯暴風雨になってアメリカのニュージャージー州に再上陸した模様。ニューヨークのウォール街などのロウアーマンハッタン地区では冠水した。下記は最新の様子を伝えるCNNの電子版。


Flooding begins as Tropical Storm Irene lashes Northeast

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New York (CNN) -- Streets flooded Sunday morning as Irene lashed some of the biggest cities in the Northeast with wind gusts and torrential rains.

Even as Irene weakened to a tropical storm, authorities in the region warned that its impact was not waning.

"Do not leave your homes. ... It is still not safe," New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said Sunday morning. "We've got flooding everywhere and flash flooding in all different parts of the state."

Officials said the storm had knocked out power to more than 3 million people and was responsible for at least 13 deaths in five states.

Streets in downtown Millburn, New Jersey, saw major flooding when the Rahway River overflowed early Sunday morning, said Lt. Peter Eakley, the town's deputy emergency management coordinator.

"It's crazy. ... The water is moving between buildings, up, down, all sorts of different directions," Rich Graessle told CNN's iReport.

In New York City's lower Manhattan, the Hudson River overflowed, sending massive amounts of water spilling over jogging paths and pouring into at least one nearby apartment building. Water also lapped over the banks of the city's East River early Sunday, but later receded. CNN affiliate WCBS reported serious flooding in Brooklyn.

Irene left streets looking barren and desolate in "the city that never sleeps." Shelves upon empty shelves greeted shoppers at stores. Caution tape barricaded the turnstiles at subway stops.

But the flooding's greatest impact may be far from view, former Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff told CNN.

"The challenge of New York is that so much of the electricity and other infrastructure is below the surface," he said.

That means flooding could bring life in the city to a standstill even after waters recede, he said.

The threat of flooding extended beyond New York City. Outside Philadelphia, waters had already climbed to street-sign levels in Darby, Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter said, sending "couches, furniture, all kinds of stuff floating down the street."

Waves pounded the shoreline in Long Beach, New York, as water poured underneath the boardwalk and into the city's downtown area.

By 11 a.m. ET Sunday, Tropical Storm Irene had maximum sustained winds of 60 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center. The storm was moving inland over southeastern New York state and heading northeast toward New England. Even as winds decreased, the hurricane center warned that an "extremely dangerous storm surge" was expected in Connecticut, Rhode Island, Massachusetts and parts of Long Island, New York.

The storm slammed into Little Egg Inlet, New Jersey, as a Category 1 hurricane around 5:30 a.m., the hurricane center said, hitting cities along the coast as it hurtled toward New York City.

While most New Yorkers stayed holed up in their apartments, officials and residents in states further south began taking stock of the damage Irene left behind.

Authorities in Ocean City, Maryland, reopened the evacuated city.

"It was a long night last night, but I can tell you, we dodged a missile here at Ocean City," Mayor Rick Meehan told reporters.

While Irene dumped 12 inches of rain by early Sunday morning, there was no major flooding. The maximum storm surge coincided with low tide, preventing the flooding that had been feared. Timing "made a significant difference," Meehan said.

But flooding remained a concern in many areas, said Craig Fugate, head of the Federal Emergency Management Agency.

"Assessments are still coming in," Fugate said Sunday morning, noting that Virginia reported particularly high rainfalls.

Powerful gusts were so strong in some states that pedestrians struggled to stay upright. Storm surges along the East Coast turned at least one beach into an extension of the ocean.

Two buildings collapsed in Philadelphia, Nutter told reporters, but no one was injured.

A nuclear power reactor in Calvert Cliffs, Maryland, automatically went offline late Saturday after a piece of aluminum siding from a building struck a transformer amid strong winds.

"The facility is safe; there is no impact to employees or our neighbors," said Mark Sullivan, spokesman for the Constellation Energy Nuclear Group. "There is no threat."

Officials have blamed at least 13 deaths across the affected region on Irene -- one each in Connecticut, Maryland and Florida, six in North Carolina and four in Virginia.

A 55-year-old male surfer died around noon in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, and a woman in Queenstown, Maryland, died after a tree knocked a chimney through the roof of her home, officials said. Connecticut Gov. Dan Malloy said downed wires appear to be to blame for one fatality in his state.

Irene first made landfall in the United States Saturday in North Carolina near Cape Lookout at the southern end of the Outer Banks. It stomped across the state for most of the day.

The storm ripped off roofs, toppled trees, induced "massive flooding" near the coast and brought down power lines statewide, according to the state emergency management division.

The hurricane unleashed 10 to 14 inches of rain over much of North Carolina and pushed a 4-foot storm surge into the Chesapeake Bay, the National Hurricane Center said.

As of midnight Saturday, Kill Devil Hills, North Carolina, had endured 31 hours of nonstop rainfall.

Reports of tornadoes came from several states, including North Carolina and Virginia -- but a final determination will have to be made by the National Weather Service.

追記。その後の様子をwebcamで視たところ、ニューヨークのマンハッタン7番街46丁目付近は雨も上がった様子。傘を持ち歩く観光客の姿が写し出されていた。2011年8月28日午前9時25分頃。

2011/08/28

超人のジャーナリスト・アイ 145 ハリケーン「アイリーン」、米国東部ニューヨークやワシントンに接近 

 昨日のニュース。アメリカの東部ではハリケーン「アイリーン」がニューヨークやワシントンの大都市を襲う可能性も出てきて、ニューヨークなどは厳戒態勢に入っている。すでに日本時間27日夜、ノースカロライナ州に上陸、倒れた木の直撃を受け5人が死亡。ハリケーン「アイリーン」はアメリカ東部沿岸を北上中。ニューヨークでは地下鉄やバスが運休、ブロードウェイのミュージカルは休演、多くの店も臨時休業している。観光客はとんだトバッチリに戸惑っているかも―。何せ上陸したら1893年以来、実に118年振りだからだ。

下記はロイター通信社の電子版記事。


New York shuts down ahead of Hurricane Irene

9:01pm EDT

By Basil Katz and Edith Honan

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NEW YORK (Reuters) - Times Square emptied out and evacuation shelters filled up as New York City shut down on Saturday ahead of Hurricane Irene, which charged up the East Coast on a direct path toward the world financial capital.

New Yorkers deserted the streets and took cover from a rare hurricane headed their way -- only five have tracked within 75 miles of the city since records have been kept. The full impact of heavy rain, powerful winds and a surging sea was expected through Sunday morning.

Rain was reported throughout the city around 8 p.m, and the National Weather Service issued a tornado watch in addition to the hurricane warning.

After Mayor Michael Bloomberg ordered the unprecedented evacuation of 370,000 people living in neighborhoods near the water's edge, more than 3,700 took refuge in the city's shelters, thousands more fled to the homes of friends or relatives, and others defiantly stayed behind.

While shelters were mostly empty, others such as the John Adams High School in Queens overflowed.

A smattering of food and liquor stores stayed open while the public transit system that moves 8.5 million people each weekday halted operations, also a first, as the giant 580-mile-wide storm unleashed 80 miles per hour winds, grounding aircraft along the eastern seaboard.

At Brooklyn Tech High School shelter, evacuees watched weather reports on a large television screen in the auditorium while others dined on mozzarella sticks, string beans, milk and apple sauce.

"I didn't want to leave (home), I wanted to stay, but I feared for my life. I didn't want to get stuck in the dark and in the flood," said Margie Robledo, 58, of Coney Island, who just arrived in New York from Puerto Rico, where the storm had hit days earlier.

CALM IN THE DANGER ZONE

Others defied the evacuation order after Bloomberg announced police would not enforce it. Despite the persistent warnings and ominous skies, the neighborhood around Brooklyn's Coney Island -- within the danger zone -- was calm. Parked cars lined the streets, and there was no sign of a mass exodus.

"They are right, we should be evacuating, but we are not," said John Visconti, 47, who owns an auto repair business and lives on the ground floor of his building in the nearby Brighton Beach area of Brooklyn. "We just want to stay home and hope for the best. We should be OK."

The evacuation zones included shiny apartment buildings in Manhattan's wealthy Battery Park City, working class Red Hook in Brooklyn and run-down public housing in Coney Island -- all neighborhoods at the water's edge.

"If the neighborhood is eventually legitimately flooded, I have food and books and whiskey," said attorney Neal D'Amato, 31, sipping a beer at the Red Hook Bait and Tackle shop bar.

He said he would ride out the storm in his fourth-floor apartment.

In Times Square, the so-called crossroads of the world, tourists were left with limited options. Broadway shows were canceled, Starbucks stores closed as was McDonald's.

Many other chain stores and attractions for kids such as the Toys "R" Us flagship store and Hershey's chocolate emporium were also shuttered.

The Frames bowling alley in the Port Authority Bus Terminal was still open, and had no immediate plans to close early, despite few customers. There was still adult entertainment on the fringes of Times Square with peep shows and stores offering porn, sex toys and lingerie open for business.

Taxis were plentiful even though mass transit halted at midday, suggested most people were staying home.

The network of 468 subway stations, 324 bus routes and two commuter rail lines was unlikely to be open for Monday morning's commute, Bloomberg said, and electricity in lower Manhattan including Wall Street could be out for days if the utility Consolidated Edison decide to preemptively shut off power. The New York Stock Exchange expected a normal trading session on Monday.

One of the danger zones, the Financial District surrounding Wall Street, was largely deserted, with clusters of pedestrians with suitcases hailing cabs to get to higher ground.

PLASTIC SHEETS AND SANDBAGS

Outside the W Hotel near the World Trade Center site of the September 11 attacks, Tamara Steil, 57, who is visiting from Michigan, waited for a hotel shuttle to take her to a midtown Manhattan hotel.

"We were here to spend money on restaurants and bars, but all these places are closed," she said, as she shared a pack of beer with other stragglers.

The South Street Seaport, which on a typical summer Saturday would be full of tourists, was nearly abandoned, the storefronts and restaurants boarded up or covered in plastic sheets, sandbags protecting the doors.

At a Manhattan Home Depot store, store clerks said they planned to stay open throughout the storm, but early on Saturday it had already run out of flashlights, duct tape, rope and tarps.

Irina Katkov, 38, an office manager, who lives in a seven-story building near the Atlantic Ocean, said about half the people in the evacuation zone where she lives were staying put, herself among them.

"We're not scared, we are ready for the fun," Katkov said. "Cameras are ready, batteries are charged, can't wait."

(Additional reporting by Martin Howell; Writing by Daniel Trotta; Editing by Xavier Briand and Philip Barbara)


■下記はニューヨークタイムズの最新電子版記事。


August 27, 2011

New York City Braces Itself, Fearing Wall of Water

By JAMES BARRON

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Hurricane Irene charged toward New York on Saturday evening, with the city all but closed down in anticipation of what forecasters said could be violent winds with the power to drive a wall of water over the beaches in the Rockaways and between the skyscrapers of Lower Manhattan. The subway system, one of the city’s trademarks, had shut down in the middle of the day.

The city worked to complete its evacuation of about 370,000 residents in low-lying areas where officials expected flooding to follow the storm, and Gov. Chris Christie of New Jersey said that more than a million people had been evacuated, mainly from four counties in the southern part of the state.

Officials warned that a big problem could be flooding at high tide, around 8 a.m. Sunday — before the storm has moved on and the wind has slacked off in and around the city, assuming it more or less follows the path where forecasters expect it to go.

“That is when you’ll see the water come over the side,” Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg cautioned at a briefing on Saturday afternoon.

The wide storm lurched onto the Outer Banks of North Carolina in the early daylight hours of Saturday and heaved clumsily but implacably north, leaving in its wake floods, impassable roads and at least six deaths. After proceeding slowly from North Carolina to Virginia, the storm weaved out to sea and onto a path expected to take it to Long Island and New York City.

Despite the city’s efforts, opening 91 emergency centers that could take in 70,000 people, the mayor said that just 1,400 had arrived by 3:30 p.m. Saturday. The only other statistics available pointed to the difficulty of getting people to abide by the mayor’s mandatory evacuation order in what the city calls Zone A low-lying areas: He said 80 percent of the residents in some city-run buildings — but only 50 percent in others — had left by Saturday afternoon.

As the storm pushed toward the New York area, Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo ordered 2,000 National Guard troops called up. Mr. Cuomo saw the first of them off from the 69th Regiment Armory, on Lexington Avenue at 26th Street, after saying they would assist the police, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority and the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey. He also said that some would be sent to Long Island, which could face heavy damage in the storm.

Mr. Christie said 1,500 National Guard troops had been deployed in New Jersey.

The mayor attributed one casualty to the storm, a 66-year-old man who fell from a ladder while trying to board up windows at his house in Jamaica, Queens. A Fire Department spokesman said the man, who was not immediately identified, was in serious condition at Jamaica Hospital Medical Center.

Just before 8 p.m., the city, along with Westchester, Suffolk, Nassau and Rockland Counties, was put on a tornado watch, according to the National Weather Service.

“It’s actually common when we have these tropical systems,” said Brian Ceimnecki of the Weather Service. He added that as the hurricane moved up the coast, tornado watches have moved right along with it.

As the transit system prepared to shut down, police officers sounded the warning, strolling along subway platforms and telling people that the next train would be the last. The conductor of a No. 4 train that pulled into the Borough Hall station in Brooklyn at 12:14 p.m. had the same message.

“This is it,” he said, smiling. “You’re just in time.”

Soon subway employees were stretching yellow tape across the entrances to stations to keep people from going down the steps and into a subterranean world that was suddenly off limits, but not deserted. Transit workers were charged with executing a huge, mostly underground ballet, moving 200 subway trains away from outdoor yards that could flood if the storm delivered the 6 to 12 inches of rain that forecasts called for. The trains were to be parked in tunnels across the city, making regular runs impossible.

Mr. Bloomberg said the transit system was “unlikely to be back” in service on Monday. He said crews would have to pump water from tunnels if they flooded and restore the signal system before they could move the parked trains out. That would mean “the equipment’s not where you would want it” for the morning rush, he said. “Plan on a commute without mass transit on Monday morning.”

Mr. Bloomberg also said electricity could be knocked out in Lower Manhattan if Consolidated Edison shut off the power to pre-empt the problems that flooding could cause for its cables. (A Con Ed spokesman said later that the company, while prepared, had no immediate plans for that kind of shutdown.)

Other officials, including Mr. Christie, repeated what they had said on Friday: Evacuate.

Mr. Christie said that 90 percent to 98 percent of residents in parts of four counties in South Jersey had left — Cape May, Atlantic, Ocean and Monmouth. About 1,200 people who were evacuated from Atlantic County on Friday had spent the night without cots at the Sun Center arena in Trenton, where many people ended up sleeping in seats, he said. They were taken to the Rutgers University campus in New Brunswick, which Mr. Christie visited after a news conference.

In Hoboken, N.J., Mayor Dawn Zimmer ordered the evacuation of all ground-floor residential units and ordered bars to close at 8 p.m.

But up until last call, about 7:45, the scene on Saturday night looked fairly normal, with young people packed into several establishments.

“What else are we going to do?” said Scotty Alpaugh, 30, who wore rainproof overalls to Black Bear Bar and Grill. “Everything else is shut down.”

In New York, Mr. Bloomberg said the evacuation and the transit shutdown, actions that he said had not been ordered before, were proceeding as well as could be expected, with officials going door to door in high-rise housing projects and firefighters driving school buses to help get homebound residents out of low-lying neighborhoods.

Phyllis Rhodie, 48, boarded such a bus outside the Redfern Houses in the slender peninsula of the Rockaways. She took along her boyfriend, three children, water, food, some medical supplies — and a case of nerves.

“I’m staying wherever they can put me up,” she said.

Officials said elevators in housing-project buildings would be shut off. And, for all the evacuation, some New Yorkers stayed put. The city did not evacuate inmates on Rikers Island because, a city spokesman explained, “It’s not in Zone A.”

Despite an aggressive city attempt to empty out low-lying waterfront neighborhoods of the Lower East Side, an estimated 10,000 people remained in the evacuation area as of 5 p.m., the official deadline for leaving, said State Senator Daniel L. Squadron. “I am highly concerned about those who did not leave,” Mr. Squadron said. (He described the area in question as south of 14th Street and east of the Brooklyn Bridge.)

The storm caused major disruptions long before the first bands of rain swirled by. The three major airports in the New York region stopped clearing flights for landing at noon. Officials said they would remain open for planes that wanted to take off, but most flights had been canceled on Friday, according to Steve Coleman, a spokesman for the Port Authority.

Amtrak canceled most trains after 11 a.m., although there was some confusion at Pennsylvania Station. A northbound train that left at 10:15 a.m. was, the conductor said, the last one going in that direction and was sold out.

The National Weather Service said the storm would churn along the Interstate 95 corridor, keeping up its 14-mile-an-hour pace. That would bring the center to the New York area by Sunday afternoon — probably east of the city on Long Island, forecasters said, although they cautioned that the path could change at any moment. The city had been under a hurricane warning, its first since 1985, since Friday afternoon.

The storm’s potential path reminded weather historians of the devastating hurricane of 1938. That storm devastated the Connecticut coast and rearranged Long Island’s geography, carving an inlet through what had been a thin but solid stretch of land on the way to the Hamptons.

On Saturday, New York awoke to an odd, greenish-gray sky, overheated air that felt heavy with moisture and only a light, summery breeze. It was not just another sleepy Saturday in August — too many people were on alert too early. In Battery Park City, long lines of taxis waited to take evacuees who carried their possessions to the curb. Uptown, some were dismayed when they found that stores like the new Fairway on East 86th Street had closed.

“It fits into the whole alarmist nature of the city,” said Mike Ortenau, 44, who lives in the neighborhood.


Reporting for the hurricane coverage was contributed by Al Baker, Michael Barbaro, Matt Flegenheimer, Christine Haughney, Thomas Kaplan, Andrew O’Reilly, Anna M. Phillips, Jennifer Preston, Melena Ryzik, Liz Robbins, Noah Rosenberg, Fernanda Santos and Tim Stelloh.

■下記はCNN.comの最新記事。

Hurricane Irene bears down on large East Coast cities
Ocean City, Maryland (CNN) -- Residents in several major East Coast cities -- including Washington, Philadelphia and New York -- braced late Saturday for the impact from Hurricane Irene.

By Saturday evening, the storm already had knocked out power in more than a million homes, forced more than a million people off the New Jersey shore alone and caused at least nine deaths.

Irene weakened somewhat since coming ashore early Saturday near Cape Lookout, North Carolina, and it's expected to slowly lose more strength overnight. But it is still a Category 1 hurricane, with sustained winds around 80 mph and extending 85 miles from its center. Forecasters expect it to remain a hurricane until it once again makes landfall Sunday afternoon in southern New England.

While the vast majority heeded calls to evacuate, emergency officials continued to plead Saturday with stubborn residents to head to high ground, warning that heavy rains and a storm surge of 4 to 8 feet could cause widespread flooding of low-lying areas and pose untold dangers to residents from Virginia to Massachusetts.

Live Blog: Get up-to-the-minute updates


"Living in New York City all my life and never experiencing a hurricane before, I have no idea what to expect," said CNN iReporter Elie Shaby, who lives one block north of where authorities have ordered evacuations in Manhattan.

By Saturday evening, five people were reported dead in North Carolina due to the storm, police and emergency officials said. That includes two who died in separate accidents when trees fell on their cars. Two cars crashed going though an intersection in Goldsboro where the traffic lights had failed, leading to the death of a child, and a driver died in Pitt County after losing control in standing water and hitting a tree.

Three died because of falling trees in Virginia, including a man who was in a Chesterfield County residence around 3 p.m. Saturday, according to the county. In addition, a 55-year-old male surfer died around noon in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, said Capt. Tamara Marris, a spokeswoman for the Volusia County Beach Patrol.

Get state-by-state updates


As of 9 p.m., Irene was 100 miles south-southwest of Ocean City, Maryland, moving north-northeast at 16 mph. It had maximum winds of 80 mph, according to the National Hurricane Center.

Ed Rappaport, a meteorologist at the center, said Saturday night that the storm would parallel the East Coast before making landfall again Sunday afternoon in southern New England. Irene may slowly weaken while it's over water, before its strength diminishes more rapidly once it hits land again.

In the meantime, he said the storm could dump up to 20 inches of rain in select locales, accompanied by powerful winds.

The hurricane already had brought 10 to 14 inches of rain to much of North Carolina, and was pushing a 4-foot storm surge into the Chesapeake Bay, the National Hurricane Center said.

Hurricane warnings extend up the coast to Cape Cod in Massachusetts, with tropical storm warnings issued for parts of coastal Canada.

Several states, including Virginia and North Carolina, saw tornadoes spawned by the storm. Delaware Gov. Jack Markell told CNN affiliate KYW that a tornado touched down in Lewes, damaging at least 17 homes.

A tornado in Tyrrell County, North Carolina, destroyed five homes and seriously damaged a business Saturday, Sheriff Darryl Liverman told CNN affiliate WITN. Vance County authorities published photos of a home damaged when a tree fell on it and crashed through a bedroom ceiling. It was unclear if anyone was injured.

What you can expect over the weekend


The National Weather Service issued tornado watches -- indicating favorable conditions for a tornado to form, even when one hasn't been reported yet -- through Sunday morning for several areas, including New Jersey and New York City.

U.S. Coast Guard Adm. William Lee, who tracked the storm Saturday by air, said he believed that -- so far, at least -- the worst fears for Irene have not come to fruition.

"All in all, the damage wasn't nearly as bad as we expected," Lee told CNN on Saturday night about the reconnaissance mission. "I've been through several hurricanes and, in comparison to ones like Frederick, Andrew and Hugo, this one (has had) significantly less damage."

As it passed through North Carolina, Irene ripped off roofs and caused other damage to homes and businesses in Hyde and Jones counties, toppled trees that blocked roads and brought down power lines statewide, according to the state emergency management division.

"We're not seeing catastrophic damage, but there is massive flooding near the coast in some places," Brad Nieman of the state's emergency management division said Saturday evening.

Heavy rain and a flooding storm surge cut off thousands of residents in Beaufort, Carteret and Pamlico counties, the state Emergency Management Agency reported.

Every road in Jones County was blocked by downed trees, the state emergency management agency reported, and a storm shelter there lost part of its roof, forcing the evacuation of 75 people who had sought shelter from the storm. Several other shelters were without power.

Road crews across the state were trying to clear roads, but trees kept falling around them, the state transportation department said.

In Roanoke Rapids, North Carolina, police and public works crews stopped responding to calls because of adverse conditions, the state emergency management division reported. Buildings in downtown Columbia, North Carolina, were flooded, the division said, relaying reports from the city's emergency manager.

A hotel facade ripped away and part of a pier fell into the ocean.

More than half a million people in North Carolina had lost power as of 7 p.m., with 5,000 people huddled overnight in 60 shelters around the state, said Brad Neiman from the state's emergency management division.

"We're not seeing catastrophic damage, but there is massive flooding near the coast," Neiman said. "A lot we will figure out at first light (Sunday)."

Authorities in communities across North Carolina, Virginia and Maryland announced curfews. Some banned the sale of alcohol. Philadelphia Mayor Michael Nutter declared a state of emergency, telling residents to be prepared to go without power for up to two weeks.

Evacuation time running out in Northeast


Boston has joined New York, New Jersey and the cities of Philadelphia and Baltimore in suspending all transit service, with no MBTA services -- including subways and buses -- on Sunday. And the Philadelphia International Airport will close from 10:30 p.m. Saturday until at least 4 p.m. Sunday, airport spokeswoman Victoria Lupica said.

In Virginia, more than 600,000 homes and businesses were without electricity, Virginia Gov. Bob McDonnell said. Officials warned people to be prepared to be without power for up to a week.

Rescue crews were able to save a couple and their cat off Norfolk after they were stranded about 200 yards offshore on their 30-foot sailboat. Norfolk Fire Capt. Mike Marsala said the couple, who lived on the boat, were trying to get to Annapolis, Maryland, when they were slowed by engine trouble. The 5- to 6-foot seas and 60 mph gusts initially prevented rescuers from getting in the water to help them off the boat.

"They were grateful, joyous to be back on solid ground," Marsala told CNN on Saturday night after the pair's ultimate rescue. "We were kind of concerned, at first, that we weren't going to be able to get them."

Glenn Beck: Hurricane Irene is a "blessing"

In Newport News, Nate Morris -- a student at Christopher Newport University, about a mile from the ocean -- said he noticed numerous trees and power lines down, few other cars out and an "eerily quiet" campus.

"There were times when you'd walk around or be in the house, and you couldn't hear anything because of the wind and rain," Morris told CNN on Saturday night. "And it sounds it like it will be a very hard night, too."

More than 1 million people on the Jersey shore had joined untold numbers of others from the Carolinas to New England in moving inland or to higher ground, away from the storm's worst impacts, New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie said.

Those who remained behind in communities where the storm has yet to hit are making a mistake believing that the storm is too weak to do any damage, FEMA Administrator Craig Fugate said.

"Some of our most devastating floods have occurred in tropical storms," he said.

The hold-outs included 92 residents of Atlantic City high-rises, many of them elderly, who refused pleas from Christie and others to get a free ride out of the danger zone. Mayor Lorenzo T. Langford told CNN on Saturday night that 94 of those inside had responded to the latest call by authorities to get out.

"We've made three sweeps, the most recent sweep probably was the last one," Langford said, adding that about 90% of the city's residents had evacuated. "We've admonished them to leave when they could."

In New York -- where the city ordered the unprecedented evacuation of 370,000 people from low-lying areas on Friday-- even residents who aren't being ordered to leave could face an arduous few days following Irene's tour of the city.

The city's transit system, shut down Saturday, may not be fully running again until Monday at the earliest, high-rise buildings are being instructed to turn off elevators and utility ConEd may have to cut power to Manhattan, Bloomberg said.

President Barack Obama continued to closely monitor the storm, according to White House officials. He toured FEMA's operations center Saturday morning. Meanwhile, defense officials told 6,500 service members to prepare to deploy to storm-ravaged regions should state officials need them.

By Saturday night, there had been few major surprises in the storm's progression -- and, even then, plenty of fears that the worst still lay ahead.

"This is a storm where, if you're in the wrong place at the wrong time, it can be fatal," New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg warned.

CNN'sChris Boyette, Jeanne Meserve, Chris Lawrence, Greg Botelho, Jason Carroll, David Mattingly, John Zarrella, Kimberly Segal, Sarah Hoye, Kristina Sgueglia, Rafael Romo, Eden Pontz and Poppy Harlow contributed to this report.

2011/08/23

超人の面白読書 88 西脇順三郎を読む

 西脇順三郎を鞄に入れて読んでいる。
①Ambarvaliaアムバルワリア・旅人かえらず(講談社文芸文庫2008年2月2刷)
②新倉俊一著『西脇順三郎全詩引喩集成』(筑摩書房1982年9月初版)
③季刊詩誌「無限」29号特集西脇順三郎(政治公論社無限編集部昭和47年8月)④雑誌「英語青年」2008年1月号特集西脇順三郎

 鞄に入れて少しずつ読んでいるのは良いがなかなか捗らないのだ。あちらの鞄こちらの鞄と持ち歩いているけれど、本や雑誌はそれなりに重い。しかも例によって読みかけの本や雑誌も入っているし我ながら呆れる。肩が凝るのも知らず。ここ二三日は急に涼しくなったがその前は約10日間ばかり酷暑続きで何もできなかった。筆者の夏休みもその酷暑の日々に出くわして、

蝉が鳴く古刹の丘の下り坂

今日もまた頭にタオル蝉ジージ

乗ってよと蝉の背中も人恋し

今年の蝉いないは地震さもあらず

バスを待つふと振り向けば蝉しぐれ

フクシマやチョウ現実の蝉ナーク

と口ずさみたくなるから不思議。

 で、西脇順三郎の話。
小千谷市立図書館の西脇順三郎記念室(英語学・英文学関係の書籍も“見て”みたい)にも行きたいと考えていざ出陣と思いきや前線の影響で冠水寸前、又もや行けず。せめて新しく甦れ、「天気」。

(覆された宝石)のやうな朝
何人か戸口にて誰かとさゝやく
それは神の生誕の日。

 この詩の解釈について上記「無限」から引用しよう。40年前の雑誌だが。
「(覆された宝石)のやうな朝」について、私は伊藤信吉氏の「あかるい朝、あたりにまぶしい光があふれ、それが戸口にさす。誰かがおとずれて、誰かと言葉を交しているかのような光の美しい情景を―」という説明を早合点して、宝石が一面にばらまかれたようなイメージを描いていた。ところがその後、宝石は一個で、それがころころと転がるイメージだと誰かから聞いたことがある。この点についていつか西脇さんに質したところ、「覆す」という大袈裟な行為と「宝石」という一つずつ蔵われているはずのものと、本来結びつくはずもないところに、面白さがあるのだということであった。(上誌河村正敏「別世界の人」307頁)
 筆者は今はなぜか渋澤龍彦の絵画的世界をイメージしてしまう。それにしてもどういう朝か―。
モダニスト、脳髄の詩人、絵画の詩人、イロニー・パロディの詩人、超然とした詩人、淋しき詩人、幻影の人そして英文学者、詩論家等々。

 まずは土のセシウム量りプレイボール甲子園の道が始まる

の短歌(2011年8月14日朝日歌壇佐々木幸綱選冒頭)の作者S先生(西脇順三郎研究家)の解釈はいかに―。(『西脇順三郎のモダニズム 「ギリシア的抒情詩」全編を読む』に詳しい)去年の某文化講演会でも話されたと思うが、筆者は用事もあってまともに聴いていなかったのだ!
 今その時のテキストを読み返している。先生の『西脇順三郎研究資料集』が待たれる。エピソードがたくさんお持ちの詩人にこの辺もフォローして欲しい。
上記の「英語青年」にもある女性研究者が堀口大學との激論で、ついにHORIGUCHI-SANをORIGUCHI-SAN(折口信夫に影響を受けた)と何度も読んで相手の堀口大學を怒らせ、しばし沈黙した後ORIGUCHI-SANはフランス語読み(フランス語のHは発音しない)ですと苦しい言い訳をしていたとか。その昔「現代詩手帖」が西脇順三郎を特集した記事があって、座談会か何かだったと思うが、すごい詩人なのに可笑しさも超一流だと思ったものだ…。それにあまりにも有名なお話は、ラテン語の卒論の話(このコラムのどこかで書いたかも知れないので省くが知りたい方はS先生にお尋ねあれ)、S先生、その原本、否コピーでもお探し頂いて「資料集」に西脇順三郎エトセトラと項目を付け加えて出されたら最高。そうしたらすぐにでも購入したい。


2011/08/17

超人の面白ラーメン紀行 152 渋谷区『喜楽』

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 『喜楽』は渋谷界隈では古くからのラーメン人気店らしく、客の中には親子二代で通う常連客もいるほど。道玄坂の百軒店にあるこの店は、テレビでも紹介されているので読者諸兄もご存知のはず。
 最初ラーメン(中華麺、650円)を注文したが、メニューの最初に書いてあった品目にこだわり、五目麺に替えた(塩味)。この迷いがやや裏目に出た。ラーメン(中華麺、650円)か、もやし麺やワンタン麺の注文が多い。店は1階2階とも満杯(1階9名、カウンター、2階19名、テーブル席)。五目麺はやはり銀座アスター麺(但し醤油味)がいい。淡白なのは良いが独特の太緬とモツ肉以外記すに足りない。完敗である。ああ、中華麺!
 渋谷に用事があっての帰り、今読んでいる本の舞台でもと考えて道玄坂を少し歩いた。この時間でもその手の女性が2、3人いる、夜の余韻がまだある通りを過ぎた下り坂あたりに偶然見つけたのがこの店(場所は大体知っていたが)。常連客の好みは熟知しているらしく、瞬時に判断して作るらしい。食べ終えて勘定時前にちらっと厨房を覗いた。チュウボーですと、堺雅章が現れるわけではもちろんないが、小柄で髭を生やした旦那の姿が見えた。直観で仕切っているのはこの人かなと思った。メニューは14種類、意外とあるのだ。

 実は暑いので映画館で涼を取ろうと考えたが、目当ての映画館が改装中、もう一館はシネマコンプレックス、この館も今や韓国系。時代は変わった!

渋谷区『喜楽』1.スープ★★2.麺★★3.トッピング★★4.接客・雰囲気★☆5.価格★☆

 

2011/08/16

クロカル超人が行く 150 丹沢大山国定公園 大山

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 丹沢山塊の東端、神奈川県伊勢原市にある標高1252メートルの大山。古くから山岳信仰の山として、浮世絵や落語にも登場、また、豆腐料理や独楽でも有名。最近では手頃なハイキングコースとしても人気を集めているところ。
 終戦記念日の昨日、大山に登った。伊勢原駅→大山ケーブルバス停(バス、所要時間25分)→こま参道経由大山ケーブル駅(徒歩15分)→阿夫利神社駅(ケーブル電車、6分)→見晴台(徒歩、35分)→山頂(徒歩、65分)食事などで約1時間休憩→見晴台・阿夫利神社駅(55分)→大山ケーブル駅(ケーブル電車、6分。満杯)→こま参道経由大山ケーブルバス停(徒歩、8分)→小田急小田原線伊勢原駅(バス、20分)のタイムスケジュール、所要時間約6時間。
 こま参道では階段にクイズが、阿夫利神社駅近くの売店ではビールに昼飯用のおにぎりを買い(午前10時半過ぎに生ビール大ジョッキを2杯呑んでいたお爺さん、孫の下山を待っていると朝から陽気)、阿夫利神社では景色を一望、やがて石ころのある沢登り、約1時間半、途中丹沢山系が見渡せる見晴台でパチリ(浮世絵にも描かれたところ)。それから登ること1時間、出会った老若男女(上は70代から下は5才まで)にこんにちはと声をかけながら登った。頂上は家族連れ、カップル、年配者などですでに人集り、記念写真は標高が刻まれた石の脇、阿夫利神社本社にお参り、隣の売店ではラーメン、焼きそばなどがすでに売れ切れ状態、テーブルでビールとおにぎりの昼食(冷えたビールのうまいこと、最高。大きな蜂もブンブン)をとった。眼下の風景を独り占めし、爽やかな風を感じながらお盆の夏を山で楽しんだ。

ふりむけば富士山、とは筆者の目の前に書いてあった目印。そして筆者の一句。

ふりむいても
見えぬ富士山
トンボ飛ぶ

 皆さん登山靴やハイキングシューズを履いていたが(筆者は軽い運動靴を履いていたが滑り易かった!)、ある家族の一組はスーツ姿に革靴、お連れはスカートにやや高い靴、お子さんは正装っぽい、いやー、目立っていた、否、浮いていたと言った方が正確だ!面白いことに、また来ようね、紅葉の季節にだって!
いやはや呆れた。その時にはそれなりの服装でお願いします、と周りの誰かが呟いたような気がした……。


2011/08/05

超人の面白テレビ鑑賞 北欧スペシャル

 つい10日ほど前にノルウェーのオスロで銃乱射事件が起きて、あの平和な国が、と世界中が驚いた。痛ましい事件だった。そのまさに事件が起きた日の23日から8日間、BSプレミアムではノルウェー、スウェーデン、デンマーク、アイスランド、フィンランドの五ヶ国の北欧スペシャルを放送。筆者はたまたま新聞の番組欄で知ったのだが、視たのは再放送分。7月30日午後から視た番組。

①ワイルドライフ
北欧 スカンディナビアの四季 巨大な鹿が森を生きる(7月30日土曜日午後0:00〜1:00)
極寒の中で森に生きる動物たち。巨大なシカを通じて読み取れることは、食うか食われかの弱肉強食の様子だ。

②ぐるっと北欧5000キロ〜スカンディナビア半島・港町巡り〜(7月30日土曜日午後2:30〜4:00)
女優野村佑香がノルウェーの北端アルタから、ロフォーテン諸島、ベルゲン、ウルネス、デンマークのヒアツハルス、スウェーデンのヨーテボリ、オスロ、コペンハーゲン、バルト海のホーンホルム、ゴッドランド島のヴィスビィ、ストックホルム、フィンランドのトッルクまでの港町巡りの船旅5000キロ。
 ロフォーテン諸島の鱈(cod)干しの様子と漁の体験(女性を船に乗り入れると不漁のジンクスを破って大漁)、鱈料理を堪能。ゾルゲフィヨルド近くではバイキング船の木造船建造所を見学、そのデザインや技術に魅了、ウルネスでは最古の木造建築の教会、ここでは磔になっているキリストはうなだれていない、むしろ明るい。木造建築の極意は梁の工夫や釘のないところもバイキングの影響と教会関係者から説明を受ける(この教会の芸術的価値は雑誌「芸術新潮」2008年12月号特集〈ノルウェーの森へ 中世の美とオーロラの旅〉に詳しい)。デンマークに入ってヒアツハルスでは牛の出産シーンに立ち会うなど酪農体験。デンマークの酪農には150ものルールがあって例えば、出産後10日以内に届けなれば罰金をかされるなど細かい規制があるからこそ良質な乳製品を産むと真面目に語る酪農家、バイキングが嗜んだお酒ミュルの入ったチーズ作り―実は南欧からデンマークにもたらした―を学び試食。
 スウェーデンのヨーテボリはその昔は帆船が行き交う交易の中心地だったが鉄の町でもあり、その典型の鍛冶屋を訪問。器用に鉄を扱う職人はこの道40年以上のベテラン、鉄もインテリアとして重宝がられている由。
実際に農場で発見され復元したバイキング船をオスロの博物館で見て納得、その洗練された美意識や機能性、独特な船の先端に北欧人の魂の象徴を感得、海賊は器用で繊細だとそのイメージを見直しながら語る女優野村佑香には、確かな発見があったようだ。とここまで書いて肝心のメモ書きを電車の中に忘れたことに気付いた。仕方がないので後は拙い記憶を辿るしかない。
 ストックホルム、ストックとは柵、ホルムは中洲という意味、大小の島々からなるスウェーデンの首都、人口75万人。旧市街(Gamla stan)にはスウェーデン王室が住む宮殿がある。この辺の地理は大昔のスウェーデン語の教科書によく出てきた地域。でも女優野村佑香は初夏を彩るストックホルムではやはり自分も興味のある北欧家具の世界へ。家具デザイン専門学校を卒業したばかりの典型的なスウェーデン女性二人の作品を鑑賞、そのシンプルなデザインとユニークな素材の組み合わせや優れた機能性に感心。この二人は近くインテリアの会社を設立するという。
 バルト海を11時間かけて最後の停泊地フィンランドのトッルクへ。フィンランド人の家庭を訪問、サウナの洗礼を受け飛び込みの初体験までしてしまう。
旅は人を魅了するけれどもまた、良い意味では人を惑わすことも事実。

③Amazing Voice 驚異の歌声ハイトーン伝説ABBA
スウェーデン生まれのタレントリリコが出演、アバのデビューから解散までの軌跡を追った懐かしきミュージックシーンの数々。

④歴史館アンデルセン・童話に隠された秘話(7月31日午後0:00〜1:00)
博識の仏文学者鹿島茂は北欧文学についても言及。アンデルセンは貧しかったが最後には金持ち階級に世話になり生活に何不自由はなかった。『マッチ売りの少女』や『醜いアヒルの子』や『人魚姫』の解釈が面白い。司会は女優室井滋、心理学者の先生も出演。字幕と人物が合わなかったところもあったようだが。

⑤スウェーデン 神話の森を行く〜魅惑の鉄道 インランズバーナンの旅〜(7月31日午後1:00〜2:30)
夏に運行される鉄道に乗ってスウェーデンの森を訪ねる旅。この世界にあっては妖精伝説もまた魅力的。

⑥ニルスの不思議な旅2011〜美しき夏のスウェーデン大空中紀行〜
セルマ・ラーゲルレーヴの原作をタイムトラベルして現代風にアレンジ。低空飛行でスウェーデンを鳥瞰出来てこれまた楽しかった。

⑦北欧 ファンタジーが生まれる庭〜アグネータ・フロックの宝物〜(7月31日午後4:30〜6:00)
ストックホルム郊外に住むスウェーデンの切り絵絵本作家の優雅な日常生活を追った、愛情溢れる世界。

 以上、この北欧スペシャルの番組を覗いた限りでの映像寸評。見逃している番組もあったが、それはまたの機会か(この放送局は再放送をよくやっているので)このテレビ局が配信しているオンデマンドで視てみたい。これを機に筆者は去年書評を試みたチェコの作家カレル・チャペックの『北欧の旅』を再読。75年前の記録文学の傑作との比較に大いに刺激された。興味のある読者諸兄は筆者のコラム2010年11月20日〜26日の記事を読まれたい。

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